How to Cite a Quote from a Website

Citing a quote from a website can be tricky. Here’s how to make sure you’re doing it correctly.

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Introduction

In academic writing, it is important to cite the sources you use in order to give credit to the original author. When you are quoting from a website, you will need to include the author, date, and page number (if available) in your citation. Here is how you would cite a quote from a website:

According to Smith (2018), “Citing sources is important because it shows that you have done your research.” (p. 1).

How to cite a quote

If you’re quoting someone from a website, you’ll want to make sure you include both the author of the quote and the date that the quote was published. Here’s how to do it:

Author’s last name, author’s first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Website, date published, URL.

For example:

Smith, John. “How to Cite a Quote from a Website.” The Writing Center, 8 May 2017, https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/quotations/.

How to format a citation

When you are writing a paper, you may want to include a quote from another source. If you do, you will need to format the citation correctly.

Here is how to format a citation for a quote from a website:

“Title of the Quote.” Title of the Website, Date of publication (if available), URL.

In-text citations

In-text citations for websites can be confusing, because there is often no author or date listed. However, there are a few different ways you can cite website quotes, depending on the context.

If you’re quoting a specific passage from the website, make sure to include the author (if available) and date:

According to the National Coffee Association, “Coffee is the most popular beverage worldwide” (National Coffee Association, n.d.).

If there is no author listed, you can use the website title in place of an author:

“Coffee is the most popular beverage worldwide” (National Coffee Association, n.d.).

Reference list

Include an in-text citation when you refer to, summarize, paraphrase, or quote from another source. For every in-text citation in your paper, there should be a corresponding entry in your reference list. APA in-text citation style uses the author’s last name and the year of publication, for example: (Field, 2005).

To cite a quote from a website in MLA style, enclose the quote with double quotation marks and include the author’s last name, the date of publication, and the URL. If you are quoting from a print article that appeared online, use “n. pag.” to indicate that no page number is available:

According to Smith (2018), “Some experts have gone so far as to suggest that we might be better off without social media” (n. pag.).

Block quotes

When you want to include a long quotation in your paper, you will need to format it as a block quote. Block quotes are indented and single-spaced, with no quotation marks around them. Here is an example of how to format a block quote from a website:

On its website, the Chicago Manual of Style recommends using block quotes for quotations that are more than five lines long:

If you omit parts of a quotation, use ellipses () to show that something has been left out. If you omit the end of a sentence, put the ellipsis after the end punctuation mark. If you omit the beginning of the sentence, put the ellipsis at the beginning of the quotation.

If you want to emphasize something in a quotation that is not normally emphasized (by italics or other means), put brackets around words or phrases to indicate that they were not part of the original text:

Parenthetical citations

When you include a direct quotation in a paper, include the author, date, and page number(s) on which the quotation appears. If the author is not given, use the title of the piece or, at least, a shorter version of it.

The exact format of your citation will vary depending on whether you’re using MLA, APA, or Chicago style. For example, here’s how you would cite a direct quotation from a website using MLA style:

According to the Declaration of Independence, “all men are created equal” (Jefferson).

If you’re using APA style, your citation would look like this:

According to the Declaration of Independence (Jefferson), “all men are created equal.”

And if you’re using Chicago style, it would look like this:

According to the Declaration of Independence, “all men are created equal” (Jefferson).

Webpage citations

When quoting from a webpage, include the author’s last name, the title of the article, the name of the website, the date you accessed the website, and the URL.

Here is an example:

According to John Smith, “quoting from a webpage is easy” (Smith). The website EasyBib.com provides clear instructions on how to citing sources. Accessed March 1, 2020, www.easybib.com/how-to-cite-a-website/apa/.

Author guidelines

There are a few different ways to cite a quote from a website, depending on how much information you have about the author.

If you have the author’s name, you can cite the quote like this:

Author’s last name, Author’s first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Website, Publisher of Website, Date of Publication, URL.

For example:

Smith, John. “How to Cite a Quote from a Website.” The Pen and The Pad, HubPages, 14 May 2014, https://penandthepad.com/cite-quote-website-4874.html.

If you don’t have the author’s name, you can cite the quote like this:

“Title of Article.” Title of Website, Publisher of Website, Date of Publication, URL.

For example:

“How to Cite a Quote from a Website.” The Pen and The Pad, HubPages, 14 May 2014, https://penandthepad.com/cite-quote-website-4874.html

Conclusion

When you have located a Quote from a website that you want to use in your paper or project, you will need to cite the source. This can be done in two ways. The first way is to include the author’s last name and the date of publication in parentheses at the end of the sentence where the quote is used. For example:

According to Smith (2017), “Citing sources is important because it lets you show where your information or ideas came from” (p. 1).

The second way is to set the quote off from your text by indenting it. In this case, you would still need to include the author’s last name and date of publication in parentheses at the end of the quote, but you would not need to use quotation marks. For example:

According to Smith (2017),

Citing sources is important because it lets you show where your information or ideas came from. This is especially useful when you are writing about controversial topics, or if you are presenting your own interpretation of someone else’s work. (p. 1)

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