How to Do In-Text Citations from a Website

MLA format is typically used for papers written in the humanities. In-text citations are required when you use someone else’s ideas, theories, or research in your paper.

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Introduction

Whenever you use someone else’s work within your own paper, you need to give them proper credit. This means providing a citation. An in-text citation is a brief mention of the source you’re using, with the full details appearing in your Works Cited (bibliography) at the end of your paper.

The main reason for including in-text citations from websites is to provide your reader with enough information so they can find the original source for themselves if they want to. It also shows that you’ve done your research and are familiar with the existing literature on your topic. In-text citations from websites usually take one of two forms:

Parenthetical citation: (Author’s Last Name, year)
Signal phrase: According to Author’s Last Name (year)…

In both cases, you’ll need to include the author’s last name and the year of publication (or “n.d.” if no date is available). You’ll also need to provide a complete reference for this source in your Works Cited at the end of your paper.

What is an in-text citation?

An in-text citation is a brief reference to a source of information used in the body of an essay or academic paper. In-text citations are included in the main body of your work to briefly indicate to your reader where you have used information from another source.

There are two main types of in-text citations:
-parenthetical citations, which appear within the text of your paper in parentheses, and
-narrative citations, which are incorporated into the text of your paper.

In-text citations usually include the author’s last name and the year of publication. For example: (Smith, 2020). If you are using a direct quote, you will also need to include the page number, for example: (Smith, 2020, p. 10).

If you are using a parenthetical citation, all of this information will be included in parentheses at the end of the sentence. For example:
According to Smith (2020), “in-text citations are brief references.” (p. 10).

If you are using a narrative citation, this information will be incorporated into the text of your sentence. For example:
According to Smith (2020), “in-text citations are brief references.”

When do you need to use an in-text citation?

You need to use an in-text citation any time you quote or paraphrase information from a source. This includes information from websites.

In-text citations from websites look like this: (Author, date).

If there is no author listed, you can use the website name instead. If there is no date listed, you can use the abbreviation (n.d.).

How to format an in-text citation from a website

There are a few different ways that you can format an in-text citation from a website, depending on how much information you want to include.

If you just want to include the author’s last name, and the date of publication, you can do that like this: (Last Name, Date). For example: (Smith, 2019).

If you want to include the author’s last name and the page number that you’re citing, you can do that like this: (Last Name, Page Number). For example: (Smith, P.1).

If you want to include the author’s last name, the date of publication, and the page number that you’re citing, you can do that like this: (Last Name, Date, Page Number). For example: (Smith, 2019, P.1).

Examples of in-text citations from websites

There are many different ways to format in-text citations from websites, but the most common way is to include the author’s last name and the date of publication. For example:

According to Smith (2020), “In-text citations from websites can be tricky.”

If you’re unsure about how to format your in-text citation, check with your professor or research supervisor.

Tips for using in-text citations from websites

When using in-text citations from websites, there are a few things to keep in mind. First of all, make sure that the website is reliable and credible. This means that it should come from a reputable source, such as a .gov or .edu website. Secondly, take a look at the date of the website. If it is more than 5 years old, you may want to find a more recent source. Finally, make sure that you include the URL of the website in your citation so that your readers can easily find it.

Troubleshooting in-text citations from websites

You may find it difficult to create an in-text citation for a website because there is often no author or date listed. However, there are some key elements that you can look for that will help you create a citation. Try to find the following information:
-The name of the author (if available)
-The title of the article or page (in quotation marks)
-The name of the website (in italics)
-The URL
-The date you accessed the site

When you are citing an online sources, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, you will want to make sure that you include the URL of the website. Second, you will want to include the date that you accessed the website. Finally, you will want to include any relevant information about the website itself, such as the author or publisher.

Here are a few examples of how to do in-text citations from websites:

(Author last name, date)

(Author last name)

(Website name, date)

Frequently asked questions about in-text citations from websites

What are in-text citations from websites?
In-text citations from websites are brief citations that appear in the body of your text. They provide information about the sources you’ve used in your research. When you’re using information from a website, you’ll need to include both a signal phrase and a URL.

Why should I use in-text citations from websites?
Including in-text citations from websites helps you avoid plagiarism by giving credit to the original author of the material you’ve used. It also helps your reader find the full citation for your source in your Works Cited list.

How do I format in-text citations from websites?
The format for in-text citations from websites depends on whether you’re using a signal phrase or not. If you are using a signal phrase, you’ll need to include the author’s last name and the date of publication. If you’re not using a signal phrase, you’ll just need to include the URL.

Author’s last name (Date of publication) OR (Author’s last name, Date of publication, Page number)
(Date of publication) OR (Date of publication, Page number)

Conclusion

When citing a website, include the author, date, title of the page, and URL. If there is no author listed, begin the citation with the title of the page followed by the date. If there is no date listed, use “n.d.” to indicate that no date is available. The in-text citation for a website should look something like this: (AuthorLastName, year).

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