How to Intext Cite a Website

Want to know how to intext cite a website? MLA Style has a specific format for intext citations.

Checkout this video:

Introduction

In academic writing, you are often required to provide evidence for your assertions, either by quoting from sources or by paraphrasing and summarizing. When you intext cite a website in MLA 8, you’re required to include the author’s name, the title of the page, the name of the website, the publication date, and the URL.

You may also choose to include additional information, such as the date you accessed the website or the name of the sponsor. Here is an example of an intext citation for a website with no author listed:

According to The MLA Style Center (2020), “Citing nonprint or sources from the Internet—including online dictionaries and encyclopedias—are a special case” (“Citing Web Pages”).

In this example, The MLA Style Center is the author of the webpage, “Citing Web Pages” is the title of the page, and https://style.mla.org/citing-web-pages/ is the URL. The publication date is given as 2020; because no specific date is given for when this page was written or updated, we use n.d. (for “no date”).

What is in-text citation?

In-text citation is a way to give credit to your sources when you are paraphrasing or summarizing their ideas in your own paper. It235 jojo cocom also allows your reader to find the sources you used. Whenever you use someone else’s words or ideas in your paper, you must give them credit by including an in-text citation.

Why is in-text citation important?

In-text citation is important because it gives credit to the original source of the information or quote you are using in your paper. When you use someone else’s work, you must give them credit so that they receive proper credit for their ideas. In-text citation also allows your reader to know where to find the full citation for the source you are quoting.

How to in-text cite a website

When you are writing a paper, you will need to cite sources that you have used. This shows the reader that you are using information from reliable sources and that you have done your research. When you are citing a website, you will need to include the author, date, title, and URL.

Here is an example of how to in-text cite a website:

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), “teenagers are especially vulnerable to drug addiction” (2018).

In this example, NIDA is the author and “teenagers are especially vulnerable to drug addiction” is the title. The date is 2018 and the URL is https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/drugs-brains-behavior-an-addiction-science-reader/preface.

In-text citation examples

In-text citations include the author’s last name, the year the source was published, and the page number (if available).

If you’re quoting directly from a source, you will also need to include quotation marks.

Here are some examples of in-text citations:
(Smith, 2019, p. 35)
(Smith, 2019)
“Quoted text” (Smith, 2019, p. 35)

when to in-text cite a website

According to MLA style, an in-text citation should include the author’s last name and the page number from which you are quoting. If the author is not named, include the title of the article. If there is no page number, simply include the author’s last name or the title of the article.

How NOT to in-text cite a website

There are many ways to in-text cite a website, but there are also many ways NOT to in-text cite a website. Here are some examples of how NOT to in-text cite a website:

-Citing an Entire Website
When citing a website, you do not need to include the entire site. You can just include the specific page or article that you are referencing. For example:

“According to the website (www.website.com), …”

-Not Citing the Website at All
If you are referencing information from a website, you must include an in-text citation. Not doing so is considered plagiarism. For example:

“This is the information I found on the internet.”

More information on in-text citation

In-text citation is a way of indicating to your reader where you found the information you are using in your writing. It can be done in two ways:

– directly quoting the information, or
– paraphrasing the information.

Whenever you use someone else’s words or ideas in your paper, you must give credit to that person. Failing to do so is plagiarism, which is a serious academic offense.

The simplest way to do in-text citation is to include the author’s last name and the date of publication, like this: (Smith 2017). If you are quoting directly from the source, you will also need to include the page number: (Smith 2017, p. 23). If there is no date listed on the website, use (n.d.).

Conclusion

Your in-text citation should include the author’s last name and the date the website was published. If you’re unsure of the author’s name, use the website’s title instead. If no date is listed, use “n.d.” for “no date.” In a reference list, include the author’s last name, first initial, publication year, title of the article or page, title of the website, URL and date you accessed the site.

Further reading

In-text citation:

To quote or paraphrase specific information from a website, include the author, date, and page number (if available) in your in-text citation. If you’re quoting directly from the website, include the paragraph number. If no author is given, start the citation with the title of the page.

Author’s last name, Author’s first name. “Title of Article.” Title of Website, Publisher of website (if available), Date published/last updated (if available), URL.

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