How to Site a Website in a Paper

How to site a website in a paper? It’s easy! Just follow these simple steps:

1. Find the website’s URL.
2. Copy the URL into your paper.
3. That’s it!

By following these simple steps, you can easily cite a website in your paper.

Checkout this video:

Introduction

There are a lot of sources you can use for research papers, but not all of them are considered credible. Websites can be good sources of information, but you need to make sure that you’re citing them correctly in order to make sure your paper is credible. Here’s how to site a website in a paper.

What is a website?

Websites are digital resources that contain information on a variety of topics. In order to site a website effectively in a paper, you must include the following elements:
-The title of the website
-The URL
-The date you accessed the site
-The name of the author (if available)

For example:
“How to Make a Website.” Wix.com, www.wix.com/html5us/make-a-website. Accessed 4 March 2020.

Why should you cite websites?

Websites should be cited in papers when they are used as sources of information. Citing websites provides credit to the authors of the website and helps to prevent plagiarism.

How to cite websites in APA format

The basic format for a web citation, referring to an entire website, looks like this:

Title of Site. Date of publication or most recent update, URL.

For example:

The Purdue Online Writing Lab. 2016, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/.

Because websites can change often and quickly, it is helpful to include the date you accessed the site as well as the URL.

How to cite websites in MLA format

When creating a citation for a website in MLA format, include as much of the following information as you can find:
-The name of the author (if available)
-The title of the page or article
-The name of the website
-The date you accessed the website
-The URL of the website

For example:
Smith, John. “How to Cite Websites in MLA Format.” The MLA Style Center, Modern Language Association of America, 8 Apr. 2020, style.mla.org/citing-websites/.

How to cite websites in Chicago style

There are two ways to cite websites in Chicago style:

1) Notes and Bibliography:

This is the most common citation style for websites. In this style, you provide a footnote or endnote every time you cite a website, and then include a full bibliography at the end of your paper.

To cite a website in a note, you will need:
-The name of the author (if available)
-The title of the website (in italics)
-The URL of the website
-The date you accessed the website (in parentheses)
-A short description of the content (optional)

Here is an example:

1. Jack Johnson, “White Christmas,” www.jackjohnsonmusic.com/song/white-christmas, accessed December 12, 2016.

2) Author-Date:
In this citation style, you provide brief in-text citations every time you cite a website, and then include full reference list at the end of your paper. To cite a website in an author-date citation, you will need:
-The author’s last name (if available) and the year you accessed the website (in parentheses)
-The title of the website (in italics) OR if no title is given, use “n.d.” to indicate that no date is available
-The URL of the webpage OR if no URL is given, use “Retrieved from” followed by the database name or homepage URL

Here is an example:

Jack Johnson’s official website (www.jackjohnsonmusic.com/) provides lyrics for his song “White Christmas.”

How to cite websites in Harvard style

There are no specific guidelines in the Harvard style for citing websites, so you can use the same format as you would for citing a print source.

In-text citations
In your paper, you need to include a brief citation whenever you quote or paraphrase material from a source. This could be from a book, journal article, webpage or any other type of publication.

The in-text citation will usually include the author’s last name (or the name of the organization that published the website) and the date it was published. If there is no date given, use n.d. For example:
(Smith n.d.)

If you are referring to a specific part of the website, you should also include page numbers after the date:
(Smith 2013, p. 5)

Reference list entry
Once you have cited a website in your paper, you need to include it in your reference list at the end of your paper. The reference list entry should give full details of the website so that your reader can find it easily. If there is no author given for a website, start the citation with the title of the page instead. Here is an example of how to cite a website in Harvard style:
Smith, J. (2013). How to cite websites in Harvard style [Website]. Retrieved from http://library.csuohio.edu/services/howto

How to cite websites in Turabian style

There are two types of website citations in Turabian: those with authors and those without.

Websites with authors:

For websites with authors, list the last name and first name of the author, followed by a period. Then list the title of the article or page, in quotation marks. Next, list the name of the website in italics, followed by a comma. Finally, include the date you accessed the site and the URL.

Example:

Smith, John. “How to Cite Websites in Turabian Style.” The Writing Center at UNC Chapel Hill, writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/turabian-style/. Accessed 20 May 2017.

Websites without authors:

For websites without authors, begin with the title of the page or article in quotation marks. Then list the name of the website in italics, followed by a comma. Finally, include the date you accessed the site and the URL.

Example:
“How to Cite Websites in Turabian Style.” The Writing Center at UNC Chapel Hill, writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/turabian-style/. Accessed 20 May 2017

How to cite websites in Vancouver style

In Vancouver style, websites are cited in the reference list, which is alphabetical by author. The author’s name (or the name of the organization if there is no named author) and the date of publication or last update are given, followed by the URL of the website in angle brackets. If a website has no date, use (n.d.). If a website is updated frequently, use the date of retrieval instead of the date of publication.

Example:

Library and Archives Canada. (n.d.). The Canadian Crown and Aboriginal peoples. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/aboriginal-heritage/crown-aboriginal-peoples/Pages/introduction.aspx

Conclusion

References to websites should include the author (if given), date of publication (if given), title of the article or page, and the URL. If no date of publication is given, use the abbreviations “n.d.” for “no date.” The title of the website should be in italics.

Here is an example:

Smith, John. “How to Make a Website.” n.d. Web Design Tips. http://www.webdesign101.net/how-to-make-a-website/.

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